In the waiting line

Kalamata hospital

The public hospital in Kalamata

Want to know a secret? OK, it’s time to spill the beans. WE’RE HAVING A BABY!!! OK, it’s out in the open now. Yes, the whole reason for me being here in Greece is that T can be with her friends and family as we two becom three.

The clock is ticking very quickly, we’re in week 38 now, Mr Bump has grown to the size of a basketball and nerves are starting to rattle ever so slightly.

Today we went for a weekly check-up in the (not so) local hospital in Kalamata. Getting used to the health system here has been, let’s say, enlightening. The labyrinthine system of health insurance means that, as a Greek citizen, depending on your previous employment history, contributions etc, you have the potential to choose a public hospital or a private clinic.

After visiting a couple of private doctors with varied results, we ended up at the public hospital in Kalamata. Everything really is so different here, too much to go into detail now, but my initial apprehensions and prejudices  have been put aside, and now it’s time to just get on with the show.

The truth is, I’m very happy with the care we’ve had so far. In the UK, you deal with mid-wives through-out your pregnancy. Over here, you get to see a doctor at every appointment. The staff are friendly, jovial and professional despite being very busy. Maybe it’s the laid back Kalamata vibe, but the whole place seems calm and quite stress free, exactly the kind of environment you want your child to be born in.

As you’re probably aware, public services are being stripped away by the austerity measures, the latest development being the discussion of a 6-day working week, however, life, just carries on here, business as usual. And I’m heartily grateful to all the doctors, nurses and staff that have brought us this far.

Today’s words in Greek:

  • επικίνδυνο – dangerous – (epee-kin-thee-no)
  • μετά – next – (meh-ta)
  • έχει πολύ κόσμο – it’s busy (lit. there are many people ) – (ehee pollee -koz-mo)
  • είναι ήσυχα – it’s quiet – (ee-nay ee-see-ha)
  • κρεβάτι -bed -(kre-vah-tee)
  • ντους – shower – (doos)
  • δεν είμαι σίγουρος – I’m not sure – (then ee-nay sig-oo-ross)
  • βοήθεια -help – (vo-ith-ee-ah)

Comments

comments

Comments

  1. T. says:

    Dangerous, not sure, help… are these the most important words you learnt after visiting the greek hospital? does your unconscious try to tell us something?

  2. Jeff Mann says:

    There’s nothing subliminal here. These are words that crop up during the day. “Dangerous” is a reference to a near-death experience when driving with a certain relative on the mountain road to Kalamata.

    “Help”, as in “do you need help?” I guess sometimes I look like I need it…